Source: Sports ranking methods, 1

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Source: Simple unsolved math problem, 8

Source: Simple unsolved math problem, 7

Probably everyone has at least seen the Mandelbrot set in some form, as it’s a popular object of mathematical artists. Here’s a picture from Wikipedia: The formal definition is as follo…

Source: Simple unsolved math problem, 6

It seems everyone’s heard of Pascal’s triangle. However, if you haven’t then it is an infinite triangle of integers with 1’s down each side and the inside numbers determined…

Source: Simple unsolved math problem, 5

Problem: Optimally pack n unit circles into the smallest possible equilateral triangle. Let L(n) denote the length of the side of the smallest equilateral triangle in which n circles have been pack…

Source: Simple unsolved math problem, 4

A perfect number is a positive integer that is equal to the sum of its proper positive divisors, that is, the sum of its positive divisors excluding the number itself. For example,  1 + 2 + 3 = 6 i…

Source: Simple unsolved math problem, 3

In 1911, Otto Toeplitz asked the following question. Inscribed Square Problem: Does every plane simple closed curve contain all four vertices of some square? This question, also known as the square…

Source: Simple unsolved math problem, 2

In 1937 Lothar Collatz proposed the 3n+1 conjecture (known by a long list of aliases), is stated as follows. First, we define the function f on the set of positive integers: If the number $…

Source: Simple unsolved math problem, 1

Recall the Fibonacci numbers F_n given by 1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21… There is no need to define them. You all know. Now take the Euler numbers (OEIS) E_n 1,1,1,2,5,16,61,272… Th…

Source: Fibonacci times Euler

On Thursday, the first in a series of public discussions on scientific topics was put on by an organisation called Mass Interaction (the name comes from a statement by Richard Feynman that “a…

Source: The nature of infinity, 2

This blog aims to show that mathematics is beautiful, useful and fun. The singular value decomposition has all these qualities. It is very elegant, and has a wide range of useful applications

via Singularly Valuable SVD.

The invariant subspace problem is still a problem

The invariant subspace problem is solved for Hilbert spaces?

The Lesson of Grace in Teaching

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