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Mathematics, M.S.

The University of West Florida Department of Mathematics and Statistics is proud to offer a synchronous, fully online masters degree in mathematics using Elluminate web conferencing software. Utilizing this free software, students can participate in graduate courses in real-time on their personal computers. Because of this real-time, interactive instruction, each student receives personal attention just like they would if they attended the class in our main campus in Pensacola, Fl. All the courses are offered after 4:00 p.m. Central Time. Course Schedule.

The Master of Science Mathematics program offers students who hold a bachelor’s degree in mathematics, statistics, or related fields an opportunity to broaden their knowledge in several fields of mathematics, statistics, and their applications. The M.S. Math program is designed for students seeking careers in science, business, industry, or government; for students who want to teach in high schools or at the community college level; or for students who plan to pursue doctoral studies. The M.S. Math program offered by the Department of Mathematics and Statistics permits students considerable flexibility in choosing courses. For example, students who want to seeking careers in financial/investment industries, banks, insurance companies, or government may choose more statistics courses that emphasize the use, adoption, and development of statistical methods and state-of-the-art computer technology in the analysis of data from problems in all fields of study. Go to web site for more information.

Look at Degree Plan. For more information about this degree, please contact Dr. Jaromy Kuhl at jkuhl@uwf.edu or (850) 474-2276.

Dr. Keith Devlin, a mathematician at Stanford University, will be launching his first free online math course, Introduction to Mathematical Thinking. It’s now scheduled to start on September 17, and the registration page just went live on Coursera, the Stanford spin-off MOOC platform now offering online courses from a number of the nation’s best universities.

MOOCtalk

A real-time chronicle of a seasoned professor embarking on his first massively open online course.

I’ve been pretty quiet on this blog since launching it on May 5.

Partly that is due to summer vacation and the start of great cycling weather. But a lot of my time got swallowed up planning and developing my fall MOOC. It’s now scheduled to start on September 17, and the registration page just went live on Coursera, the Stanford spin-off MOOC platform now offering online courses from a number of the nation’s best universities.

All my Stanford colleagues who gave courses in the first round earlier this year reported how much time it takes to create such a course, no matter how long you have been teaching at university level. Knowing that you won’t be in the same room as the students, where there is ongoing interaction and constant, instant feedback…

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Taking free online courses is gaining momentum. There are many options to choose from: Khan Academy, Education – YouTube, and Udacity. Some come with ivy league and other top universities backing such as MIT’s and Harvard’s edX (a Joint venture builds on MITx and Harvard distance learning), and Coursera which offers host courses from Princeton University, Stanford University, University of California, Berkeley, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, and University of Pennsylvania.

The world is watching and people have welcomed this movement with open arms! For instance, Udacity’s (founded by three roboticists) first class, “Introduction to Artificial Intelligence,” over 160,000 students in more than 190 countries enrolled! They aim to continue this trend by teaching 160,000 plus students statistics with it’s latest course: “Intro to Statistics (ST101) Making Decisions Based on Data.” This class is being taught by leading computer scientist and Udacity co-founder Sebastian Thurn a PhD in computer science and statistics.

Khan Academy is not-for-profit with the goal of changing education for the better by providing a free world-class education to anyone anywhere.

Coursera is a social entrepreneurship company that partners with the top universities in the world to offer courses online for anyone to take, for free.

Udacity is a private educational organization that believes university-level education can be both high quality and low cost (For some courses, you will have an opportunity to take a certified exam, which will have some cost.)

“Why aren’t we giving our students a chance to even hear about these things, let alone giving them an opportunity to actually do some mathematics, and to come up with their own ideas, opinions, and reactions? What other subject is routinely taught without any mention of its history, philosophy, thematic development, aesthetic criteria, and current status? What other subject shuns its primary sources— beautiful works of art by some of the most creative minds in history— in favor of third-rate textbook bastardizations?”

Read the rest here.

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